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What to Do Versus a Big River Bet (3 Simple Tips)
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This article was written by blackrain79.com contributor Fran Ferlan. Playing the river optimally is what makes or breaks your winrate.  It’s the biggest money street and you often have to make a decision for your whole stack. The amount of money in the pot by the river often paralyzes players, because they are overly focused on the pot size, which affects their decision making process.  So what should you do versus a big river bet? Well, when you ask a broad question, you tend to get a broad answer, so here it is: it depends. There’s a lot of factors to consider here: your opponent type, previous action, board runout, pot odds, your relative hand strength, just to name a few. Not a huge help, so let’s try to break it down in this article. 1. Try to Bluff Catch Versus Loose and Aggressive Players Let’s start with the type of player we are up against. Most players will primarily bet for value when they fire off a big river bet, especially at the micros.  The only exception would be loose and aggressive players. This is true for both regulars and aggrofish. You can generally call wider against aggrofish than you would against LAG regulars. The looser and more aggressive the player, the wider you should call them down.  This is an advanced poker strategy that works extremely well in today's small stakes games. BlackRain79 discusses it in more detail in this video: So in practice, this means that sometimes you should call them down with hands you wouldn’t be comfortable calling with otherwise, like top pair weak kicker, second pair, two pair on a wet board and such.  It’s important to trust your judgment in these situations, otherwise you’re better off folding earlier if you suspect you’re going to get barrelled and pushed out of the pot.  However, just because someone is loose and aggressive, doesn’t mean they will have only bluffs in their range, especially on the river. The board runout is an important factor when deciding how wide you should call. Generally speaking, the drier the board, the wider you can bluff catch.  Why?  Because your opponent sees the same community cards you see, and if they bet huge on the river, they’re basically saying that the board doesn’t scare them and they don’t care what you are holding.  On the other hand, if the river bricks (i.e. a river card doesn’t change anything significantly, because it fails to complete any straight or flush draws, for example), your more observant opponents might put you on a busted draw and try to bluff you out of the pot.  They can also have a busted draw of their own, as decently winning LAGs know the power of semibluffing on earlier streets, and know a large majority of their opponents won’t have the heart to call down their triple barrel without a monster hand. In this situation, you should look for an opportunity to bluff catch with your top pair or second pair, for example. Bear in mind that this isn’t something you should try to do often, as these kinds of situations are more of an exception than the rule, but who doesn’t love a good hero call from time to time? If you’re able to pick off a huge pot with a mediocre hand, it can do wonders to your bottom line, as most players wouldn’t have the nerve to pull it off.  It will also make it more difficult to play against you, because you’ll show that you are able to call down in less than ideal circumstances, and won’t be pushed around.  Just a disclaimer:  Know that it’s a high-risk, high reward play, and should be attempted only in specific circumstances, against specific opponents, on specific boards and against specific previous action.  You should base it on sound information and tells you’ve picked up on, not just the feeling that this guy is bluffing, I’m gonna call him down with my Ace-high. Big River Bet Example Hand #1 Effective stack size: 100BB. You are dealt A♦8♦ in the BB. A LAG reg open-raises to 3x from the BU. SB folds, you call. Pot: 6.5BB. Flop: T♣7♠6♥ You check. Villain bets 3BB. You call. Pot: 12.5BB. Turn: 2♣ You check. Villain bets 6BB. You call. Pot: 24.5BB. River: A♠ You check. Villain bets 16BB. You: ??? You should call. This is a great spot to bluff catch based on our opponent type, previous action, and the board runout. Let’s break it down. A loose and aggressive reg open raises from the button. We assume their range is very wide here, probably close to 50% of all hands. We have a decent speculative hand. We can even opt to 3-bet light from time to time, but we decide to flat call. We flop a gutshot straight draw, and we expect the villain to fire off a c-bet with pretty much a 100% of their range, which he does. The turn doesn’t change much for us, except it puts a possible flush draw on the board. The villain double barrels, but since not much has changed for us from flop to turn, and are getting about 3:1 odds on a call, we decide to continue. The river doesn’t complete our gutshot, but we do end up improving to a top pair. Is it good enough for a call? Let’s look at it from the villain’s perspective.  We didn’t give him any reason to assume we are holding an Ace. In fact, we checked three times, so if they had to put us on a range, they would assume we have a Tx hand, a busted straight or a flush draw.  Conveniently, that’s a part of their perceived range as well. The river comes with a scare card, so it wouldn’t be a surprise if they tried to buy the pot there. Are we going to be good a hundred percent of the time? Of course not, but we don’t need to be. This is something that BlackRain79 talks about in Modern Small Stakes. They have a significant amount of bluffs in their range for our call to be +EV, considering their player type, their open-raising position, our passive lines, non-coordinated board and so on.  When we take all of that into consideration, we can infer that we can call profitably. As for the aggrofish, aka complete maniacs, you can widen your river calling ranges considerably. It is also a high risk, high reward play, but these players are the only ones that will have a significant amount of bluffs on the river.  Why?  Because their ranges are already extremely wide on previous streets, so it’s fair to assume they will get to the river with all kinds of busted draws, Ace-high hands, fourth pair etc. While their aggression can certainly be profitable in the short term, as even they can occasionally catch a monster hand, they will be the most significant long term losers.  You can’t outrun math. So when playing against them, you should be making more hero calls than you would usually be inclined.  Be aware that their maniacal ways are usually short-lived, so you should try to get them to donate their stacks to you before the next guy.  And you usually won’t have the luxury of waiting around for the monster hand to try and trap them.  So next time you find yourself facing a huge river bet against them, go with your gut, take a deep breath and call them down. Your winrate will thank you for it. Make $500+ Per Month in Low Stakes Poker Games With My Free Poker Cheat Sheet Are you having trouble consistently beating low stakes poker games online or live? Are you looking to make a consistent part time income playing these games?  That is why I wrote this free little 50 page poker cheat sheet to give you the exact strategies to start consistently making $500 (or more) per month in low stakes poker games right now. These are the exact poker strategies by the way that I used to create some of the highest winnings in online poker history at the lower limits, as a 10+ year poker pro. And I lay them all out for you step by step in this free guide. Enter your details below and I will send my free poker cheat sheet to your inbox right now. 2. Look for Possible Completed Draws As far as all the other player types are concerned, like fish who aren’t of the aggro persuasion (which is most of them) and TAGs, you should be very careful when calling big river bets. This is especially the case if they donk bet big into you. (A donk bet is a bet made against the previous streets’ aggressor).  Look for possible completed draws and ask yourself if their previous action makes sense that way. If the answer is yes, your overpair or top two pair probably isn’t good enough anymore.  Think of it this way: would you bet big out of position on the river against someone’s previous incessant aggression without a really strong hand? You probably wouldn’t. And neither would the majority of the player pool at the micro stakes.  Big River Bet Example Hand #2 Effective stack size: 100BB. You are dealt A♠Q♠ on the BU. You open-raise to 3x. SB folds, a loose passive fish calls in the BB. Pot: 6.5BB Flop: A♦3♦Q♥ Fish checks. You bet 5BB. Fish calls. Pot: 16.5BB Turn: 8♣ Fish checks. You bet 16.5BB. Fish calls. Pot: 49.5 River: J♦ Fish bets 40BB. You: ??? You should fold. Let’s break down the action street by street. There’s not much to say about preflop. We’re dealt a great hand on the button, and we can assume the recreational player will call us down pretty wide in the big blind. We flop top two pair and should start building the pot as soon as possible. We expect to get called by a bunch of Ax hands, gutshot straight draws, flush draws, you name it. The turn doesn’t change much, but it does add a couple of gutshot draws if our opponent called the flop with hands like JT, J9, or T9, for example.  We’re still miles ahead of villain’s range, so we decide to charge them a premium for their drawing hands. We can even consider overbettting, but we go for a pot sized bet. And we get one of the worst river cards possible. The fish fires off a huge donk bet. There is nothing left for us to do but bemoan our luck and fold begrudgingly.  The Jack on the river completes a number of straight draws and a flush draw. If we go back to preflop, we should expect this particular opponent to have practically all suited junk in their range.  Fish love chasing draws, and they love playing suited junk. Nevermind the fact that the chances of flopping a flush are only 0.8%. Now, we could argue that it’s a fish, they don’t know what they’re doing, they could be bluffing. Or they could have any number of two pair hands we’re ahead of. Fair enough. But if they did have a two pair hand, for example, wouldn’t they go for a check-call option, considering such a scary board?  Even fish can see three diamonds on a board. And yes, they could be bluffing, but there is nothing in their previous history that would suggest that. You should always be on the lookout for disrupting patterns when playing poker.  If an otherwise weak and timid opponent suddenly starts blasting off big bets, they didn’t just randomly decide to mix it up a little. They are politely letting you know they have the nuts. As a rule of thumb in poker in general, calling should be the last option you consider. As the old adage goes, if your hand is good enough for a call, it’s good enough…
Sebastian Henao Leads MILLIONS Online Mini Main Event
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The MILLIONS Online festival has gotten off to a flying start with the Mini Main Event obliterating its $1 million guarantee. A massive crowd of 1,127 players bought in across a pair of starting flights and only 169 of those starters remain in the hunt for the $184,507 top prize. MILLIONS Online Mini Main Event Top 10 Chip Counts Place Player Country Chips 1 Sebastian Camilo Toro Henao Mexico 27,039,049 2 Elio Fox Mexico 25,419,260 3 Luciano Hollanda Brazil 23,000,730 4 Patrick Blye Canada 22,663,403 5 Nikolai Penkin Russia 18,426,901 6 Thomas Boivin United Kingdom 18,388,054 7 Viteslav Cech Czech Republic 18,020,370 8 Daria Krashennikova Russia 17,750,348 9 Tom Macdonald United Kingdom 17,618,322 10 Joseph Cheong Mexico 17,118,762 Sebastian Henao finds himself in the envious position of going into Day 2 as the tournament’s chip leader. The Mexico-based grinder is armed with 27,039,049 chips and must fancy his chances of taking down this event from this position. Victory will not be an easy task because there are some exceptional players in the chasing pack. Elio Fox is one of those superstars. Fox, also grinding from Mexico, has 25,419,260 chips in his stack and will have a major say in where this title ends up. The two-time WSOP bracelet winner has almost $10 million in live tournament winnings and more than $4.5 million from the online poker world. Daria Krashennikova flying high in the MILLIONS Online Mini Main Event Slightly further down the chip counts, you find Canada’s Patrick Blye (22,663,403) who is riding the crest of a wave having won the APAT WCOAP Main Event last weekend for $27,408. He’s guaranteed another $2,105 right now but he definitely has an eye on the top prize. Also in the top 10 chip counts at the start of Day 2 are Thomas Boivin (18,388,054) and Russian starlet Daria Krashennikova (17,750,348). As are British high stakes cash guru Tom Macdonald (17,618,322) and Joseph Cheong (17,118,762). Stellar Names Litter The Field Those players are joined by some of the game’s biggest names. Such luminaries as Will Kassouf (16,075,000), Dominik Nitsche (12,483,080), Tom Middleton (11,180,475), and Mike Sexton Classic champion Daniel Dvoress (7,917,694) are all still in contention for glory. As are the likes of Justin Bonomo (6,362,236), David Peters (6,325,618), Kelly Saxby (5,313,311), David Yan (4,882,878), Ami Barer (3,473,910), Roberto Romanello (3,305,634), Hristovoje Pavlovic (2,255,971), and Mike Watson (915,478). Play resumes at 19:05 GMT on February 15 and continues until the 169 returning players are whittled to the final table of nine. Each of those finalists will then be guaranteed $14,826 and will be eight eliminations away from a $184,507 score. Love poker? Join party! If you’re ready to jump into the action, then click here to download partypoker and get started! If you already have an account with us, click here to open partypoker and hit the tables!
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Super Daily Legends Give You A Better Chance of Winning Big
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Our Daily Legends tournaments continue to be extremely popular thanks, in part, to their fantastic structures. How do you improve something that resonates so well with you, our valued players? You supersize them, of course! Super Daily Legends are now a thing and we can’t wait to see you compete in them. We’re supercharging a different Daily Legends tournament every week, which means keeping the same buy-in but giving the guarantee a massive boost! Daily Legends give you a better chance to reach the money places because the limited re-entries and reduced late registration significantly level the playing field. Super Daily Legends give you a better chance to win a share of an even larger prize pool and do so without the need to grind until the early hours of the next day. Get Ready For The $50,000 Guaranteed Super Titan You don’t have long to wait to play in your first Super Daily Legend tournament because one is coming your way on February 16. The Super Titan shuffles up and deals at 19:05 GMT on February 16 and guarantees the prize pool will reach at least $50,000 for your $33 buy-in. Only a single re-entry is permitted in the Super Titan and it must be made before the end of the eighth level when late registration slams shut. You sit down with a generous starting stack of 50,000 chips and play to an eight-minute clock where the blinds start at 250/500/65a. You’ll still have more than 30 big blinds in your arsenal even if you leave it to the last minute to register the structure is that good. Win Your Super Titan Seat For Only $3.30 We want as many of you as possible to sample the delights of the Super Titan so you’ll find plenty of $3.30 satellites waiting for you in the lobby. Select the “Satellites” filter under the “Daily Legends” tab and search for “Super Titan” to bring them all up. They have up to 10 Super Titan seats guaranteed, which is pretty cool for a meagre $3.30 investment. Love poker? Join party! If you’re ready to jump into the action, then click here to download partypoker and get started! If you already have an account with us, click here to open partypoker and hit the tables!
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You’re Invited to a LOVE PARTY and There Are Prizes Galore!
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We are throwing a LOVE PARTY and every partypoker player is invited to join in festivities. There are sackfuls of mystery prizes to be won every day, plus weekly prizes too. Love Party? You bet you do! We’re spreading the love from February 11 right through to March 3, that 21 days of non-stop partying. Each day sees a new LOVE PARTY mission find its way to your partypoker account. Opt-in, complete the mission and receive a mystery prize. LOVE PARTY Missions Missions are super simple and include tasks such as winning a hand with ace-king so you should have no worries about completing all 21 LOVE PARTY missions and bagging 21 prizes. Mystery prizes for completing LOVE PARTY missions include $0.25 and $1 SPINS tickets, and MILLIONS Online tickets worth between $1.10 and $55. There are also tickets to the daily LOVE PARTY freerolls that have $1,000 worth of tickets guaranteed to be won. These LOVE PARTY freerolls kick off each day at 19:00 GMT. Prize Probability LOVE PARTY ticket 70% $0.25 SPINS ticket 10% $1 SPINS ticket 13% $1.10 MILLIONS Online ticket 4% $5.50 MILLIONS Online ticket 1% $11 MILLIONS Online ticket 1% $55 MILLIONS Online ticket 1% Reload Your Account And Receive A Weekly Prize With MILLIONS Online right around the corner, you may be considering reloading your account so you can play in the plethora of satellites and the MILLIONS Online events. We want to give you a bonus when you make a deposit into your partypoker account. There are three special bonus codes for you to use, one for each week of the LOVE PARTY promotion, and each one awards a mystery prize. You can use each code once, which means three guaranteed prizes finding their way to your account. LOVE PARTY Deposit Bonus Codes Dates Deposit Code February 11-17 LOVEPOKER February 18-24 JOINPARTY February 25 – March 3 LOVEPARTY LOVE PARTY Deposit Bonuses Prize Probability LOVE PARTY ticket 50% $1 SPINS ticket 30% $1.10 MILLIONS Online ticket 12% $5 cash 5% $11 MILLIONS Online ticket 2% $50 cash 1% Love poker? Join party! If you’re ready to jump into the action, then click here to download partypoker and get started! If you already have an account with us, click here to open partypoker and hit the tables!
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Patrick Blye Wins APAT WCOAP Main Event For $27.4K
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The curtain came down on a massively successful APAT World Championship Of Amateur Poker (WCOAP) with the crowning of the Main Event champion. Patrick Blye of Canada is that champion, a result that saw the Canadian walk away with an impressive $27,408. The $109 buy-in Main Event attracted a bumper crowd of 1,751 entrants who ensured the $150,000 guarantee was blown out of the water. $175,100 was shared among the top 263 finishers, a min-cash weighing in at $212 and a final table appearance boosting that prize to $2,116. Place Player Country Prize 1 Patrick Blye Canada $27,408 2 Randy Vermette Canada $18,618 3 Jamie O’Connor United Kingdom $12,709 4 Michael Errington United Kingdom $8,436 5 Shane Pollington United Kingdom $5,748 6 Zachary Lipeles Austria $4,390 7 Jelmer De Visser Netherlands $3,406 8 Stephen Prandstatter United Kingdom $2,706 9 Julian Selinger Malta $2,116 Malta’s Julian Selinger was the first of the nine finalists to bust. Blinds were 300,000/600,000/75,000a and Selinger open-shoved from early position for 3,746,922 chips with . Shane Pollington called from the big blind with and busted Selinger courtesy of an ace on the river of the board. The first of three British players, Stephen Prandstatter, crashed out in eighth-place for a $2,706 return on his $109 investment. Prandstatte came unstuck during the 350,000/700,000/87,500a level. Jelmer De Visser raised to 1,470,000 with , Blye three-bet to 3,150,000 with and Prandstatter four-bet all-in for 4,236,421 with . Both players called the all-in bet. The flop came and De Visser checked. Blye bet 2,100,000 into the 14.45 million chip pot, which folded out De Visser. Blye won the pot and busted Prandstatter when the turn and river fell and . Seventh-place and $3,406 went to De Visser. The action folded to Jamie O’Connor on the button and he min-raised to 1,400,000 with . De Visser three-bet all-in from the small blind with for 11,779,562 only to see Blye call with . O’Connor folded. The five community cards ran and the tournament lost another player. Austrian star Zachary Lipeles was the next player to fall by the wayside, his exit in sixth-place locking up $4,390. Michael Errington kicked off the preflop betting win a min-raise to 1,600,000 with and Lipeles called in the big blind with . Both players check the flop. The turn was greeted by a pair of checks. The river completed a wheel for Lipeles but a higher straight for Errington. Lipeles bet 1,360,000 and called off the 3,524,316 chips he had behind when Errington set him all-in. Game over for Lipeles. O’Connor Takes Control The final five became four with the untimely demise of Pollington. Errington followed his fellow Brit to the rail. O’Connor raised twice the big blind to 2,400,000 with and Errington made it 5,400,000 from the small blind with . O’Connor ripped it in and Errington called off the rest of his 14,356,173 chips. Both players paired their ace on the board, but O’Connor’s jack-kicker won him the 41.3 million chip pot. O’Connor now had a massive chip lead and looked set for APAT WCOAP glory but it didn’t work out that way because O’Connor was the next player out of the door. Nothing went right for O’Connor while play was three-handed. His final hand saw him lose a coinflip to Blye. Blye min-raised to 3,200,000 with , Randy Vermette folded his in the small blind, but O’Connor jammed for 43,379,662 in total with . Blye called. The Canadian’s sevens held as the board ran . O’Connor collected $12,710 for his impressive third-place finish. Blye Hold Huge Heads-Up Lead Blye went into heads-up holding a 145,604,156 to 29,495,844 chip advantage over fellow Canadian Vermette. It didn’t take long for Blye to get his hands on Vermette’s chips and become the WCOAP Main Event champion. From the button, Blye made it 3,200,000 to go with and Vermette called with . Both players improved to a pair on the flop, but both players checked. The turn brought the into view, further improving Blye’s hand. Vermette bet 5,600,000 into the 6,800,000 pot, Blye raised enough to put Vermette to the test for the 24,591,688 chips he had behind and Vermette called. The river was the , which failed to change the course of the hand and a card that sent Vermette home in second-place with $18,619 to console himself with. Congratulations to Blye who is a worthy champion, a champion with $27,408 more in his partypoker account than a couple of days ago. Blye also receives a coveted APAT gold medal and a custom WCOAP Main Event bracelet. Top work! A Fitting End to a Superb Festival We’re sure you’ll agree that this APAT WCOAP festival was superb. All 16 championship events were freezeouts, had incredible structures and awarded some juicy prizes. It was amazing to see amateur poker players from all around the world head to partypoker and showcase their skills on the big stage. We can’t wait for the next edition of the WCOAP, can you? Love poker? Join party! If you’re ready to jump into the action, then click here to download partypoker and get started! If you already have an account with us, click here to open partypoker and hit the tables!
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What to Do Versus a Pot Sized Bet From a Fish
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This article was written by blackrain79.com contributor Fran Ferlan. Facing a pot sized bet can be a difficult spot to play.  We are faced with a big decision, often in marginal situations, and have to decide then and there whether or not to continue and potentially put our entire stack on the line on consecutive streets, or give up right away and relinquish our equity.  The problem becomes even more complicated when the bet we face comes from an erratic and unpredictable opponent, aka the fish. What the hell are they doing this with? Why are they donk betting? Do they have the nuts or complete air?  You want to find out, but it’s expensive to do so. And it’s very difficult to put them on the exact range, let alone narrow it down to a couple of hands. Facing a Pot Sized Bet By a Fish So what do we do in a situation like this? Unfortunately, the answer is all too familiar: it depends. But that’s not really helpful, so let’s break it down in this article. But before providing some answers, let’s first define the questions and narrow it down to make our lives easier. This article will focus on facing a pot sized donk bets in single raised pots and 3-bet pots from recreational players on the flop and turn, because:  A) it’s a spot in which players tend to struggle the most, and... B) because these situations are more common than facing a C-bet against fish, as fish usually call more than they raise. Also, when playing against fish, you should be the preflop aggressor most of the time anyway.  The article was written with cash games in mind, but is applicable to other formats to some extent as well. Definition of a Recreational Poker Player (Fish) For the purpose of this article, a fish is a recreational player that plays too many hands (typically 40% or more). If you play online you can use a HUD to show you this right on your screen. They also play fairly passively both preflop and postflop (with the exception of aggro-fish, more on that below) and makes huge fundamental mistakes and all kinds of crazy nonsense plays.  Or in other words, our most beloved customers.By the way, if you don't know the basic strategies to consistently beat these kinds of players, check out the brand new BlackRain79 video with the best 14 beginner poker tips: A few more quick definitions, so that we are on the same page here: A single raised pot (SRP) is a pot in which there was a raise preflop, and the other player(s) just flat call instead of 3-betting. A 3-bet pot is a pot in which a player re-raised the original raiser and other player(s) call. A 3-bet pot will usually have a much more shallow stack-to-pot ratio (usually 5 or less). By the way, if you need a reminder on SPR and how it affects your preflop strategy, BlackRain79 already has you covered in a recent article. What is a Donk Bet? In a broader sense, a donk bet is a bet made out of position against an earlier street aggressor. For example, you raise preflop on the button, villain calls in the small blind, and fires up a bet on the flop.   It isn’t necessarily a derogatory term, as there are situations where it might be a correct play.  But as this article will hopefully demonstrate, when fish make a pot sized donk bet, it’s rarely an optimal play. We already said that our decision on what to do against a pot sized bet depends on a lot of factors. So let’s break them down, starting with how committed we are to the pot. Make $500+ Per Month in Low Stakes Poker Games With My Free Poker Cheat Sheet Are you having trouble consistently beating low stakes poker games online or live? Are you looking to make a consistent part time income playing these games?  That is why I wrote this free little 50 page poker cheat sheet to give you the exact strategies to start consistently making $500 (or more) per month in low stakes poker games right now. These are the exact poker strategies by the way that I used as a 10+ year poker pro. And I lay them all out for you step by step in this free guide. Enter your details below and I will send my free poker cheat sheet to your inbox right now. SPR and Pot Commitment The smaller the SPR, the more committed we are. If the stack-to-pot ratio is 3 or less, we are committed with a top pair hand or better.  This will happen often either in 3-bet pots, or when fish are playing shortstacked (i.e. their effective stack size is significantly less than 100 bb, because they bought in for a minimum of 40 big blinds, for example).  So when we face a pot-sized bet against a fish on the flop with a made hand, we should be inclined to get all our money in the middle, preferably as soon as possible. Top pair hands go up in value in shallow SPR pots, as opposed to speculative hands that perform better in deeper SPR pots.   The reasons we shouldn't try to slowplay in this situation are abundant. First of all, implied odds are bigger on earlier streets than the later ones, so fish are more likely to call us down with all kinds of crazy draws, like gutshot draws, backdoor flush draws and so on.  They don’t care about the math, and the risk-reward concept is only vaguely familiar to them.   Secondly, the board runout might scare them off. If they have a top pair or second pair on the flop, they might end up with a third or fourth pair by the river, and won’t be as willing to pay us off.  And lastly, fish have extremely wide preflop calling ranges. The wider the range, the harder it is to connect with the flop.  Fish are also notoriously impatient, and if they have little money left behind, they’ll often just roll the dice and try to get lucky with their suited junk, fourth pair, ridiculous draws and so on. So with a top pair hand or better in a small SPR pot, your best bet is just get all the money in as soon as possible and hope your hand holds up against their nonsense.  It won’t always be the case of course, but as long as you’re getting your money in with a mathematical edge, you’re good. You did your job, and the rest is up to the poker gods. Example Hand Effective stack sizes: 80BB. You are dealt K♥Q♥ on the BU. A loose passive fish min-raises to 2x in the CO. You 3-bet to 7x. Blinds fold, fish calls. Pot: 15.5 BB Flop: K♠9♦7♣ Fish bets 16.5 BB You: ???  You should raise. Let’s consider the previous action, the flop texture and villain’s potential range. A fish min-raised in the CO, which means they probably like their hand somewhat, but since they play north of 40% of all hands, we can’t narrow their range too much.  We go for an isolation 3-bet and the fish calls. Their range is capped, meaning we can probably eliminate AA, KK, and AK. We flop top pair decent kicker and face a big bet. We need to make a decision right then and there. Commit or quit. Folding is out of the question, of course.  SPR is 4.7, i.e. on the smallish side of the spectrum. We aren’t necessarily automatically committed, but in this spot against this particular opponent we pretty much are, so we should play for their whole stack. A number of hands that would give us action against which we’re ahead of is through the roof. Any Kx hand, like KJ, KT, a bunch of drawing hands, like QT, QJ, JT, J8, T8, T6, 86, 85, 65, maybe even 9x hands like Q9, J9, T9, 98 and so on.  Remember, we are playing against somebody that plays nearly half of all hands, so they can have ALL of those hands in their range and then some.  Sure, there are some hands that have us beat, but those are just a small part of their overall range.  We are quite comfortably ahead most of the time, and should get our money in and let that edge play out.  We can call here as well, but a lot of turn cards can kill our action. Remember, implied odds are bigger on the flop than on the turn, so we should take advantage of that.  What About Drawing Hands? Having a top pair hand against a fish and facing a pot sized bet in a shallow SPR spot is pretty straightforward, and these hands basically play themselves. There’s not much more to do than get the money in and hold your breath.  But as we know, most hands miss most flops. We don’t have a made hand on the flop more often than we do. We usually either miss or have some sort of a drawing hand. Also, effective stacks can be quite deeper, particularly in cash games.  This is where it gets a little trickier, and we need to rely on math to make an educated guess on how to proceed. When we face any bet on the flop, it can be extremely useful to memorize certain pot odds in relation to the bet size. That way, you don’t need to waste any brain power to calculate the pot odds in every single situation.   Poker is essentially an extremely complex math problem, so it’s useful to use some shortcuts in order to make better in-game decisions. One such shortcut is to remember that when you face any pot sized bet, you are getting 2:1 pot odds on a call, which means you need to win the hand 33% of the time on average for your call to be profitable.  So if your equity is 33% or more against your opponents range, you can continue profitably.   But how the hell can you know if your hand is good 33% of the time? You can’t. In order to know that definitively, you’d have to know your opponent’s exact range, which is virtually impossible.  What’s more, that’s only the part of the equation, because you also need to take into consideration a number of other factors, such as implied odds, action on future streets, board runout etc.  Too many unknown variables, too little time.  To avoid such paralysis by analysis, let’s try to simplify once again and focus on what we actually know. We can’t accurately predict the fish’s range, but we don't really need to. We can rely on our intuition backed up with a little bit of math once more.  If we have a drawing hand, again, it might be worth memorizing how often we’ll hit our outs. The Rule of Four   We can use the rule of four to quickly guesstimate our equity, by simply multiplying our number of outs by 4. This rule becomes less reliable the more outs we have, but it’s accurate enough for most in-game situations. Here are the chances of improving your draws from flop to river you should have memorized: A flush draw completes 35% of the time. An open-ended straight draw completes 32% of the time. A gutshot straight draw completes 17% of the time. So we see that calling a pot sized bet on the flop with a flush and open-ended straight draw can be outright profitable.  Of course, we won’t always be drawing to the nuts, so even if we do improve, it doesn’t mean we’ll necessarily win the hand, so these percentages are only a guideline. There are many other factors that determine whether or not our play is +EV or not, but since a lot of those factors will be unknown, we can always fall…
“Winning MILLIONS Online Would be The Cherry On Top Of A Very Good Year”
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Pascal Lefrancois is a poker player who is respected and feared in equal measure. Lefrancois has won almost $5.3 million from live poker tournaments and several more million from the online poker world. 2010 saw Lefrancois win a WSOP bracelet in a $1,500 No-Limit Hold’em event. You may recall he poised for his winner’s photograph bare-chested! Lefrancois had more clothes on when he won the £25,000 No-Limit Hold’em Super High Roller at the 2017 MILLION Dusk Till Dawn, and kept his clothes on when he triumphed in the €10,300 partypoker LIVE MILLIONS Barcelona Grand Final Main Event. That last result awarded Lefrancois a career-best €1,700,000 ($2,097,211) and a place in the MILLIONS history books. After enjoying so much success in the live arena, Lefrancois is surely missing playing poker in a brick and mortar venue. “Of course I’m missing live poker! I especially miss travelling, interacting, and having drinks with friends I have made in the poker community along the years.” Poker’s elite players are obviously delighted when they secure a big prize – who wouldn’t be? – but they also love testing themselves against fellow superstars. They thrive under the pressure of having to perform to the best of their ability. “It felt amazing winning the MILLIONS Grand Final. First, because it’s obviously a lot of money. Also, the MILLIONS attracts the best players from all around the world and it feels great beating that kind of competition.” Lefrancois Outplays The Stars MILLIONS certainly does draw in the best players the game has to offer. Lefrancois defeated the likes of Davidi Kitai, Dominik Nitsche, and the legendary Stephen Chidwick at his MILLIONS Grand Final final table before sending Adam Owen to the rail in second-place to secure the title and have his name etched on the famous MILLIONS trophy. It seems like a lifetime away since the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic stopped live MILLIONS events taking place. Hopefully, they’ll return sooner rather than later, but until they do players continue to transition to the online poker world. “With the pandemic, a lot of players transferred from live poker to the online felt and that created a lot of action at the higher stakes. So basically, I’ve played a ton of online poker!” Lefrancois will be playing even more online poker in the coming weeks as he prepares to try and win the $5 million guaranteed MILLIONS Online Main Event and the high buy-in side events. “I’ll buy in directly to all MILLIONS Online high stakes tournaments. The action online has slowed down a little lately, so I’m excited to play these big buy-in events.” Big players shine brightly in major events and this is especially true when talking about Lefrancois. He won a pair of Poker Masters events worth more than $820,000 combined. A High Roller Club title followed before victory in the WPT Super High Roller banked Lefrancois more than $315,000. Another $585,175 winged its way to Lefrancois’ account when he triumphed in the Caribbean Poker Party Online Super High Roller event. A Cherry On Top Of a Remarkable Year Those results are just a handful of Lefrancois’ partypoker recent partypoker results. It is almost impossible to rank which of Lefrancois’ achievements are the best, even the great man himself admitted as much. “It’s very tough to give a ranking to achievements, but once again, I expect all the best poker players to play [MILLIONS Online] and be able to come out of these large field events on top would be the cherry on top of a very good year for me!” Don’t Miss The Massive MILLIONS Online Main Event Satellite on February 14 Lefrancois has already said he is guaranteed to play the MILLIONS Main Event and you could be joining him. He’s buying in direct, but you can win your seat from a single cent! There’s a massive MILLIONS Online #08 Main Event 1A Satellite taking place at 21:00 GMT on February 14, one with 20x $5,300 MILLIONS Online Main Event Day 1A seats guaranteed; that’s $106,000 worth of tickets! MILLIONS Online is set to be massive. It runs from February 13 through March 9 and you can check out the full, bustling schedule here. Love poker? Join party! If you’re ready to jump into the action, then click here to download partypoker and get started! If you already have an account with us, click here to open partypoker and hit the tables!
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This Weekend’s Big Games Award Massive Prizes
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Our trio of Big Game tournaments awarded some massive prize this week. The champions of The High Roller Big Game, The Big Game, and Mini Big Game shared almost $130,000 between them! Davison Tops Star-Studded High Roller Big Game The High Roller Big Game drew in a 118-strong crowd this weekend and the top 20 finishers shared the $300,000 prize pool. Recent Mike Sexton Classic champion Daniel Dvoress bust in 21st place and popped the all-important money bubble, locking up at least $5,309 for the surviving players. Pascal Hartmann and Team partypoker’s Isaac Haxton were the first players to bust in the money places. Alexandre Reard, Nathan Talsma, and Roberto Romanello followed that duo to the rail. Jans Arends, Andrii Novak and high stakes specialist Matthias Eibinger crashed out before Koray Aldemir, Christian Rudolph, and Russian pro Artur Martirosian followed suit. Only two of the nine finalists didn’t walk away with a five-figure haul for their $2,600 investment. Christoph Vogelsang and Pim Gieles being those stars. Daan Mulders and fellow Dutchman Wietse Hasper were the next casualties before Shawn Daniel ran out of steam in fifth-place. Marius Gierse’s tournament ended in a fourth-place finish before Vladimir Kravchenko’s exit in third left only Ami Barer and Robert Davison in the hunt for the huge top prize. Barer would have been the favourite to win with the neutrals thanks to the Canadian having won several million dollars from poker. Davison overcame the odds to claim the $73,494 top prize for himself and resign Barer to a $47,291 consolation prize. Satellites for this week’s High Roller Big Game are available in the lobby right now starting at only $3.30! The High Roller Big Game Final Table Results Place Player Country Prixe 1 Robert Davison United Kingdom $73,494 2 Ami Barer Canada $47,291 3 Vladimir Kravchenko Ukraine $32,447 4 Marius Gierse Austria $22,943 5 Shawn Daniels Canada $17,024 6 Wietse Hasper Netherlands $13,622 7 Daan Mulders Netherlands $11,516 8 Pim Gieles Netherlands $9,789 9 Christoph Vogelsang United Kingdom $8,117 Vamos! Vicente Locks Up Big Game Title Brener Vicente of Brazil is the latest in a long line of partypoker players to win the $530 Big Game. A field of 485 entrants ensured the $200,000 guarantee was smashed by $34,100 and it was the top 79 finishers who got their hands on a slice of this prize pool. Dominic Nitsche burst the money bubble, paving the way for such luminaries as Preben Stokkan, Niklas Astedt, Sam Grafton, and Anton Wigg to pad their bankrolls with some prize money. Nobody at the final table won less than $3,844 for their efforts, with the final four finishers scooping five-figure prizes. Adrian Mateos was the first player to net this juicy amount, namely $13,155. British pro Ben Jones fell in third for $19,863, which left Jeppe Bisgaard and Vicente heads-up for the title. The final two players struck a deal that saw Vicente crowned champion and collect $37,563, with Bisgaard officially finishing in second place with a prize of $32,517. The Big Game Final Table Results Place Player Country Prixe 1 Brener Vicente Brazil $37,563* 2 Jeppe Bisgaard Denmark $32,517* 3 Ben Jones United Kingdom $19,863 4 Adrian Mateos United Kingdom $13,155 5 Lee Amestoy United Kingdom $9,175 6 Julien Perouse Canada $7,272 7 Aleksejs Ponakovs Estonia $5,842 8 Padraigh Lally Ireland $4,736 9 Igor Dursel United Kingdom $3,844 *reflects a heads-up deal Esparza Outlasts Monster-Sized Field in Mini Big Game Abel Esparza helped himself to the $18,424 top prize in the Mini Big Game after he outlasted a massive field of 2,493 opponents. Esparza’s heads-up opponent, Matheus Graciolli, was the tournament’s other recipient of a five-figure prize, namely $12,506. A special mention for everyone else who reached the final table, which was no mean feat considering the size of the field. Daniil Nabokov (9th – $1,397), Kyle Jones (8th – $1,795), Michele Tocci (7th – $2,266), Eric Neves (6th – $2,928), Jamie Munro (5th- $3,843), Jakub Maryska (4th – $5,652), and Mauricio Silveira (3rd – $8,529). You can win your way into this week’s tournament for a mere $5.50 outlay, good luck! The Mini Big Game Final Table Results Place Player Country Prixe 1 Abel Esparza Mexico $18,424 2 Matheus Graciolli Brazil $12,506 3 Mauricio Silveira Brazil $8,529 4 Jakub Maryska Czech Republic $5,652 5 Jamie Munro United Kingdom $3,843 6 Eric Neves Brazil $2,928 7 Michele Tocci Malta $2,266 8 Kyle Jones Canada $1,795 9 Daniil Nabokov Russia $1,397 Other Weekend Highlights There were plenty of big scores enjoyed on February 7, thanks in part to the new PLO Daily Legends tournaments. Check out some of the highlights below. OelaPaloema – first-place in The High Roller One Shot for $49,678* arowana – first-place in The 300 for $24,057* MrLuckyMan – first-place in The Weekender for $17,445* SeeUiN1HouR – first-place in The One Shot for $14,293* Muilpeertje – first-place in The Gladiator for $13,215* Killer K – first-place in The Great Game for $8,584 Vindruvan_ – first-place in The Fortress for $4,960* Oksiee – first-place in The Steel Wheel for $2,700* AllMeMaybe – first-place in The Chieftain for $1,680 Love poker? Join party! If you’re ready to jump into the action, then click here to download partypoker and get started! If you already have an account with us, click here to open partypoker and hit the tables!
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Three More WCOAP Champions Crowned; Main Event is Today
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Three more partypoker players can call themselves APAT WCOAP champions after a trio of Championship Events crowned their winners. The PLO, Turbo Knockout, and Turbo are now done and dusted, paving the way to the massive $150,000 guaranteed WCOAP Main Event and its $20,000 guaranteed Mini Main Event cousin. Suokas Wins PLO Championship For Finland Jarkko Suokas took down the PLO Championship and saw his $55 investment turn into $2,386. Finnish poker players tend to love pot-limit Omaha and Suokas is definitely in that camp. Suokas defeated Kazakhstan’s Andrey Tin heads-up to lock up the title and the lion’s share of the prize pool. Tin collected $1,651 for his runner-up finish, which will go some way to numbing the pain of falling at the final hurdle. Third-place finisher Andrey Kilyushev was the tournament’s other recipient of a four-figure prize. The man from Russia scooped $1,158. WCOAP #13 – PLO Championship Final Table Results Place Player Country Prize 1 Jarkko Suokas Finland $2,386 2 Andrey Tin Kazakhstan $1,651 3 Andrey Kilyushev Russia $1,158 4 Jean Yip Belgium $777 5 Ronaldn Gijtenbeek Netherlands $560 6 Drew Atkins Canada $439 7 Steven Fraser United Kingdom $353 The Czech Republic Has a WCOAP Champion Tomas Lestina is more than $6,000 richer today thanks to winning the Turbo Knockout Championship. The bounty payments grew large by the time the final table was reached and it was Lestina who secured the biggest of them all. The Czech grinder’s $3,160 first-place prize was bolstered by a bounty payment weighing in at $3,035, making for a total combined score worth $6,195. His bounty prize was so large because a PKO tournament’s champion gets their hand on their own bounty when they’re the last player standing. Thomas Reilly of the United Kingdom was the event’s runner-up. Reilly walked away with a combined prize worth $3,609, an impressive return on a $55 investment. All but two of the seven finalists scooped four-figures when bounties were included, showing you don’t have to spend a lot to win big at partypoker. WCOAP #14 – Turbo Knockout Championship Final Table Results Place Player Country Prize Bounties 1 Tomas Lestina Czech Republic $3,160 $3,035 2 Thomas Reilly United Kingdom $3,155 $454 3 Max Hoffmann Belgium $2,123 $1,094 4 Jan Bucl Czech Republic $1,401 $178 5 Vitaliy Ostrovyi Ukraine $931 $143 6 Matthew Carter United Kingdom $711 $250 7 Andreas Goll Germany $498 $321 Kafouros Wins Turbo Championship For Greece Greek player Georigios Kafouros won the penultimate Championship event of the WCOAP, namely the Turbo Championship. Some 657 players bought in and created a $32,850 prize pool that was way more than the advertised $20,000 guarantee. The tournament concluded a shade over five hours after the first cards were pitched, meaning Kafouros’ $5,696 top prize was the equivalent of a $1,100 hourly rate, wow! Kafouros defeated James Reid when the tournament was heads-up, leaving Reid to collect $3,954. Other players who navigated their way to the final table and banked a four-figure prize were Theodoros Konstantinidis, Viteslav Cech, and Aleksey Konoplev. WCOAP #15 – Turbo Championship Final Table Results Place Player Country Prize 1 Georgios Kafouros Greece $5,696 2 James Reid United Kingdom $3,954 3 Theodoros Konstantinidis Malta $2,744 4 Viteslav Cech Czech Republic $1,832 5 Aleksey Konoplev Russia $1,228 6 Charles Chattha United Kingdom $946 7 Antoan Asenov Bulgaria $716 Other WCOAP Winners Eryck Soares Lopes Rabelo – first-place in the WCOAP Mini Turbo Knockout for $830* Gustav Henrik Staffan Warn – first-place in the WCOAP Mini Turbo for $814 Ben Prior – first-place in the WCOAP Mini PLO for $448 WCOAP Main Events Start at 19:15 GMT The tournament every APAT member has been waiting for is finally here: the $150,000 guaranteed WCOAP Main Event. 19:15 GMT is when you need to be ready to get your grind on in the $109 buy-in Main Event, which is the same time the $11 buy-in $20,000 guaranteed Mini Main Event takes place. Satellites for the Main Event start at only $1.10 and are running right now. Good luck! Love poker? Join party! If you’re ready to jump into the action, then click here to download partypoker and get started! If you already have an account with us, click here to open partypoker and hit the tables!
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“sunrunn3r” Leads KO Series Christmas Opener
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The KO Series kicked off on December 25 and the first events have seen two of their three starting flights completed. Day 1C of the Christmas Openers shuffles up and deals at 16:05 GMT on December 27 with Day 2 taking place at 20:05, where we will see the first KO Series champions crowned. KO Series #1 – Christmas Opener Top 10 Chips Counts “sunrunn3r” is the player to catch after two of the three flights in the $215 buy-in Christmas Opener. Some 863 players have bought in so far and $172,600 of the $250,000 guaranteed prize pool has been collected. Only 129 of those entrants are through to Day 2 and nobody has more chips than “sunrunn3r”. They return to the action armed with 2,510,279 chips and has already collected $443.75 in bounty payments. Three more players finished their flights with more than two million chips. “Fabrice Soulier” has 2,253,278 chips and $150 in bounties, “SalvadorShkryab” has 2,129,366 chips and $450 worth of scalps, while “SirShake” has 2,086,539 chips and an impressive $637.50 from the bounty prize pool. Place Player Chips Bounties 1 sunrunn3r 2,510,279 $443.75 2 Fabrice Soulier 2,253,278 $150.00 3 SalvadorShkryab 2,129,366 $450.00 4 SirShake 2,086,539 $637.50 5 Dvingminator 1,432,332 $550.00 6 GyazoReplayer88 1,402,547 $612.50 7 fofty 1,310,788 $350.00 8 AegonTargaryen 1,301,376 $543.75 9 JacquesChips 1,250,825 $150.00 10 parisoo75p 1,217,398 $325.00 KO Series #1 – Mini Christmas Opener Top 10 Chips Counts The Mini Christmas Opener is shaping up to be massive as the guarantee has already been smashed with one flight remaining. A field of 3,321 players have created a prize pool of $66,420 with Day 1C waiting in the wings. “Palsgaard1” is in the envious position of chip leader right now and their chip tally is going to take some catching. They finished their Day 1 with a mountain of chips worth 3,227,305 and $73.75 from the bounty prize pool. Unsurprisingly, that is the most anyone has scooped from this event so far. Place Player Chips Bounties 1 Palsgaard1 3,227,305 $73.75 2 edy14101 2,603,245 $54.37 3 Gashi24 2,540,510 $12.50 4 Haisa27 2,524,523 $56.87 5 foggeratack 2,427,717 $38.75 6 Sioz21 2,201,334 $51.25 7 copinsh 2,112,932 $68.75 8 el.paparazzi 2,053,635 $46.87 9 IamBuddhaaa 1,992,768 $27.50 10 Symphony_95 1,929,964 $31.25 KO Series #1 – Micro Christmas Opener Top 10 Chips Counts The Micro Christmas Opener looks set to obliterate its guarantee as $6,776 of the advertised $7,500 has already been collected with 3,388 players buying in across Day 1A and 1B. “Lewiston18” forged a huge lead for themselves, ending their flight with a handful of chips under four million! Their 3,999,572 stack has 1.3 million more chips than any of the surviving players in this $2.20 buy-in tournament. The chip leader is freerolling into the money places having amassed $10.54 worth of bounties on their way to claiming that lead. Place Player Chips Bounties 1 Lewston18 3,999,572 $10.54 2 gigislo88 2,668,677 $5.12 3 makaron1999 2,386,695 $9.93 4 Reimond1099 2,352,571 $3.62 5 BodyCount85 2,249,579 $3.46 6 tongan.Crip 2,235,559 $3.25 7 Yordan Andreev 2,184,858 $2.25 8 h1freg 1,942,445 $5.22 9 M0NEYBYMONDAY 1,834,878 $2.75 10 Bengaltig975 1,810,063 $8.55 KO Series Events Scheduled For December 27 The third and final flights of the Christmas Opener tournament start at 16:05 on December 27. Get involved for $2.20, $22, or $215. There are, of course, tournament dollars satellites and traditional satellites available. The biggest buy-in event of the KO Series so far starts at 19:05 GMT, the $1,111 buy-in One Shot. This has a whopping $300,000 guaranteed prize pool, while the $111 Mini One Shot guarantees at least $200,000 will be won. Our Micro One Shot has an $11 buy-in and a $40,000 guarantee. Dozens of satellites for the One Shots are running right now! Time (GMT) Tournament Buy-in 16:05 KO Series #01 – Christmas Opener Day 1C $215 16:05 KO Series #01 – Mini Christmas Opener Day 1C $22 16:05 KO Series #01 – Micro Christmas Opener Day 1C $2.20 19:05 KO Series #02 – One Shot: $300K Gtd $1,111 19:05 KO Series #02 – Mini One Shot: $200K Gtd $111 19:05 KO Series #02 – Micro One Shot: $40K Gtd $11 20;05 KO Series #01 – Christmas Opener Day 2 20:05 KO Series #01 – Mini Christmas Opener Day 2 20:05 KO Series #01 – Micro Christmas Opener Day 2 Love poker? Join party! If you’re ready to jump into the action, then click here to download partypoker and get started! If you already have an account with us, click here to open partypoker and hit the tables!
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